Thursday, September 9, 2010

App Store Review Guidelines

Today, Apple posted guidelines for the App Store review process (requires developer login). This is a huge step in the right direction. The document still contains a lot of wiggle room and vague conditions and doesn't change the fact that Apple still has total discretion and can reject your app for new, currently unstated reasons if they want to, but it is definitely good guidance for App Store developers and should reduce the number of rejections for unknown reasons. If you develop for the App Store, you should read this end-to-end. Now.

Apple also issued a press release today that states that Apple is setting up a review process for rejected apps and also says that Apple is loosening the restrictions contained in several clauses of the Developer Program License (3.31, 3.3.2, and 3.3.9). I'm hoping that these changes will allow Briefs.app on the App Store, but I haven't heard anything yet from Rob to indicate that the review status has changed.

Fingers crossed for Rob and Briefs.app and kudos to Apple for listening and making changes.



14 comments:

Luke said...

Perhaps now is a good time for him to cut his losses on the current wait and self-reject and re-submit Briefs? Nothing to lose from what I can see...

K. A. Barber said...

Quite concise. The easiest to understand direction to come out of Apple on this issue. Hopefully this fixes some opinions on the rejection process.

pierre said...

Do you guys think it means that Apple will finally allow applications made with Flash on the store? I'll be very disapppointed if it were the case.

I hope Briefs will be approved soon, btw.

Jeff LaMarche said...

Pierre:

The plain reading seems to be that applications created with Flash's development tools will be okay if they don't run afoul of other provisions of the review process, but that actual Flash (.swf) files will still be verboten.

But, I'm not sure we know for sure yet.

Jeff

Cananito said...

I have mixed feelings here. It's great because now more people will be able to develop apps for the App Store. But on the other hand, I'm a huge fan of native stuff, the experience is just not the same when you use an application in any platform (Mac, Windows, iPhone, etc.) that it's not developed with their native developing environment.

I hope we se more high quality apps that smart people from other platforms can make, and not an infestation of ugly apps, which is most likely...

K. A. Barber said...

I think that there will be an initial burst of flash to iOS ports but eventually any one developing for any multi touch device will have to embrace the paradigm regardless of development tool.

I have been hearing murmurs from the peanut gallery that now Windows PCs are viable development platforms for iOS due to the new change/relaxation to the guidelines. I am confused at how this could be, considering the way apps are submitted to the app store....

warmi said...

"I have been hearing murmurs from the peanut gallery that now Windows PCs are viable development platforms for iOS due to the new change/relaxation to the guidelines. "

They always have been ... it is just a matter of what kind of API you restrict yourself to.
For instance in my case, I have been using my PC as my primary dev since forever ( I much prefer Visual Studio to XCode and overall Windows 7 to OSX).

If you .. say develop games and are using only GLES and OpenAL ( which is what I am doing) then with a few simple classes to wrap platform specific differences and armed with Image Technologies’s own GLES 1/2 emulator ( which is actually better than what you get from Apple, because it does use your desktop GPU for rendering) , you are pretty much set.

Obviously, you need to periodically test the app on the device itself ( and if you write asm code , obviously you can only do that on the device ) but 90% of time I don’t even touch my mac.

Andrew said...

This is great news, but I also have some concern on the "flood" of non=native apps coming..

And also.....

Perhaps it's my fault for not already knowing this.. but I'm a bit upset about the clause:

9.2 App user interfaces that mimic any iPod interface will be rejected

I am in the middle of writing a MIDI synth which has the ability to organize songs into playlist and present in a similar interface to the iPod app (complete with the Now Playing screen).

I got the idea to use this interface from Apple's Remote app since it also simulates the iPod interface (and it makes perfect sense).

Most importantly I wanted to "go the extra mile" to give the user a familiar interface for a familiar sort of task. After all thats the idea with being consistent right?

But it seems it was an extra mile the opposite direction and my plans of actually making the interface I came up with a reusable consistent iPod-UI framework I might as well forget about (I had some other music related apps in mind).

I could understand if I was simulating the *functionality* of the iPod app (playing MP3 audio files using an iPod like interface), but this is not what I am doing.

I am a believer of simple and consistent UI. But I can't help but feel a little "cockblocked". That's the Apple challenge after all.

The positive I can take out of this is that I am now challenged to try to design something *better* but not over-engineered.

Is there a specific representative at Apple who takes feedback like this on the review process, or does this fall under Bug Report ...?

Warhawk012 said...

Agree w/Luke re:Briefs. He should self-reject, re-submit, and put it through the pipeline again.

Pretty much any time an app goes in limbo after 2 weeks or so it should be re-submitted.

Lalita said...

have mixed feelings here. It's great because now more people will be able to develop apps for the App Store. But on the other hand, I'm a huge fan of native stuff, the experience is just not the same when you use an application in any platform

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Menon said...

erhaps now is a good time for him to cut his losses on the current wait and self-reject and re-submit Briefs?

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Dr. Arend Hintze said...

Oh man,

I hate it so much, Apple appers to me totally inconsistent in this process. I try to publish stuff, which get rejected for something that I just saw in a different (already released) game, where I got the idea from...

The stranges thing was an app where I write iPod Touch in Helvetica 14, and Apple rejected it since iPod Touch had to be written in Arial 14 ... no kidding, who the hell spots that?

Cheers Arend

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Melvin said...

I guess so. iPhone application development is growing faster and faster these days. So we can hope that apple will allow applications made in Flash also. Even adobe has announced a new feature of Flash 5 that can create native iPhone applications. So we can look forward for the best things.


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